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Superwomen Albert Payson Terhune

Superwomen

Albert Payson Terhune

Published
ISBN : 9781230239903
Paperback
64 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER NINE. MADAME DUMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER NINE. MADAME DU BARRY THE SEVEN-MILLION-DOLLAR SIREN. SHE came from the same neighborhood that had produced Joan of Arc. She even claimed relationship to the long-dead Maid. But at that point all likeness between the two comes to a very abrupt end. She is known to history as Marie Jeanne Gomard de Vaubernier, Comtesse du Barry. The parish register of her birthplace describes her, less flamboyantly, as Marie Jeanne, natural daughter of Anne Becu, known as Quantigny- born Aug., A. D. 1 746. There are many details in Marie Jeanne du Barrys story that I am going to omit--at my own request- not only because they are unwriteable, but because their sordid vulgarity is also drearily stupid. I apologize in advance for the omissions. But even after the process of weeding out, I think there will be quite enough left to hold the interest. When Marie was six, Anne Becu drifted to Paris-- the Mecca of her trade. And soon afterward, an admirer of Annes, one Dumonceau, was coaxed into lavishing two dollars and forty cents a month on Maries education. Dumonceau had been one of Annes wooers in the village days, and it has been suggested that his interest in little Marie was prompted by more than mere kindness--in fact, that he and the infant were more than kin and less than kind. In any case, the monthly two dollars and forty cents paid Maries expenses in a convent school, where she spent the next ten years. This Sainte-Aurore convent, in the Rue Neuve Sainte-Genevieve, was a philanthropic refuge for all young persons of honest parentage who are in circumstances where they run the risk of ruin. The rules of the Sainte-Aurore were far stricter and icier than those of the most investigatable of modern orphanages. Among the punishments...